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, kathy. it's because of her i'm here today and here at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again. i'm glad i have broken that promise to myself and here. it's a pleasure to be on the podium again. we met in the '70s what we were both regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think that anymore. francis and i were asked by james mcgreger burns to be the co-chair of the american political science invention program. we came up with a program that even i think jim burns was a little alarmed by. he in fact put in to action. i have known francis since then. she has remained an honest and authentic voice of progressivism and radicalism with a deep interest with those they have shown -- the homeless and the poor. not how they can be helped but how they find ways to help themselves through the movement and work that they do. it's a pleasure to have her perspective this afternoon in responding to these comments. i'm very pleasured to jackie davis, the chairman of the -- and rachel and members of the executive committee the
. ♪ >> the city itself is try cultural. we both more authors and poets than most communities. >> welcome to santa fe on booktv. with the help of comcast cable partners for the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary scene and history of new mexico and its capital, a city resting at an altitude of almost 7,000 feet whose name means hope and faith in spanish. we will travel in and around this town of 80,000 to meet with local lawyers to learn about the unique cultures, personalities and history of the city and state that dates back 400 years to the times of colonization attempts by the spanish. all this and more as booktv and our comcast cable partners take you to santa fe. >> we're here in the palace press. james mcgrath morris and these are early printing presses. it seemed like a perk picked -- perfect place to talk about the man revolutionized american newspapers. webmac first started working on a boat people would react with recognition when i said i was writing about joseph pulitzer the clear from their expressions they knew the name but nothing about his life because pulitzer shares his
nine votes every time the city to council took a resolution. so we really needed, even the support of romania and its successors at a time when the united states didn't like an awful lot of the things that they were, in fact, doing. keeping a coalition that broad, that deep onboard, i think it have something to say about constraining objectives. >> i was a colonel at the time, and while all this discussion was going on i was focus on running off guard and running off tackle. you know, down at the fundamental level. i had been, the two years before, the gulf war i've been on the joint chiefs of staff, and i've been the executive director of three joint chiefs of staff, and was there general powell's first six months, and the whole thing at the time, we were this close to the sink, commander-in-chief of sin, being an admiral. it went down. it was between the two-three stars because between schwarzkopf and a navy three-star admiral. because at the time it was all about the tanker wars. that's all we've been doing so there was, there was no thought -- we have no war plans. america has
purchased in its international school in new york city were none of the students are native english speakers. ms. houser tells the story of a student who escaped nepal and attended the international high school. >> so many advocates have amazing stories and the one i wanted to read is about a tibetan boy who left tibet as a little boy, escaped by hiding in a suitcase to travel to the border of nepal and so he and i worked pretty hard on his story to get all the facts straight. the man said motioning at a small suitcase on the ground. it was the fall of 2003, two years before a new one would arrive in international and they're standing on a street. he looked at the man in back of the suitcase. the man was his father's friend, a farmer with a faith filled with worry. black nylon the plastic handlebar, rubber wheels. noong had never touched a suitcase before and inspected it closely. there was chinese flattering on it he could not read. the main compartment was only about two by three feet, the size of a child's coffin. noong was small for 11, but he wasn't that small. he got the firmware must
possible by the rise of the first city states in mesopotamia about 5000 years ago. by definition you could not have a conventional army without a state. so until you its digital conventional armies which have officers and a list of ranks, and a bureaucracy in logistics and all these other things we associate with conventional armed forces. but guess what? as soon as you at the very first city states in mesopotamia, they were immediately being attacked by nomads from the virgin islands. essentially guerrillas. and so from the very start organized militaries have always spent a lot of their time fighting unconventional, irregular warfare. and you know what? those terms don't make a heck of a lot of sense. that's one of the big takeaways that i had from doing six years of reading and research for this book. the way we think but this entire subject, it's all messed up. we think that somehow conventional warfare is the norm, that the way you all to fight is about these conventional armies slugging it out in the open. but the reality is those have always been the exception. just think about the
, and we had some leftovers. those leftovers went to the city, extra stock. it then went as a part of a sister or city program with a local gentleman down to mexico and went to children in mexico. so there you have the literary arts, the performing arts, the educational value and the city cultural outreach all in one volume. form an allegiance to it. if you don't like what they carry, tell them. a lot of what we order comes from suggestions from our customers. i wish you had this book, i wish you had that book. and we'll get it for them. and very often we'll get another copy for the store, and very often that will sell brick quickly. so go to your local store whatever you're trying to buy. see what they have, talk to the people. these are your maybe the neighbors. -- these are your neighbors. >> for more information on booktv's recent visit to santa fe, new mexico, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >>> and now, general stanley mcchrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his
of congress is women and 45 of the states have mail governors, 90 percent of large cities have mail mayors but after that there is not systematic attention. 45% of the school board are women but those are not as likely to be the first office to. a future career. so people don't use that as a stepping stone. >> host: is that a definition of success? >> most people do start at the local lovell and climbed the state level are maybe federal office. what i learned was low over 4,000 men or women it is important to focus your political ambition and the issues you care about to it is not necessarily the most effective route to to wait 20 years you are most affected about what you are enthusiastic. >> host: to have a case study of a failure somebody who ran for the wrong reasons? >> guest: we have a series of people resurveyed and interviewed, about 4,000 women and men, lawyers, educators, pol itical activists and then follow up phone interviews with 300. there are examples of people who thought they wanted to run for office, so those who were party activists and their heart was not it is someone
, and we must thank the city of savannah department of cultural affairs, festival upon spores, members, and individual donors for their support. it is because of them that we are able to bring you these esteemed authors for free. if you enjoyed today's speakers and would like to make a donation to the festival, we've provided yellow buckets at the door when you exit. please consider giving to our bucket list for next year's gifted scribes. before we get started, i just have a couple of housekeeping notes for you. please take a moment to silence your cell phones. i had to do that myself. okay. immediately following his presentation, mr. gore will be signing copies of his book. please go to the fellowship hall which is located directly behind the pulpit, and you go out the doors and around, and a right turn as you enter the exit the sanctuary. there's volunteers outside to direct you. mr. gore will be able to sign 400 books, and you must have the numbered card that was included with your book purchase. your signing order will correspond with your card number, and you will be called in gr
sends somebody out to waziristan , huge chunks living in cities as destitute refugees, and every day is like 9/11 for us. so, again, go back to the man in the village, and particularly the impact on women and children. whatever the debate about drones, remember there's a model humanitarian dimension that is missing. the impact on women and children is devastating and this has been documented in studies like the recent one by stanford and new york university. >> host: you mentioned drones and a lot of your book, your newest book, the thisle this --e and the drone, and the debate in washington. what's the view of drones in these tribal areas, afghanistan, pakistan? >> guest: again, peter, you use the word debate. there is a debate in the united states. it's just starting and it will pick up. but the debate implies two opposing points of view. the donate americaer americaer - the debate in america is one sided. i would like too hear from of yemen. somalis, who are vices to the drone strikes, what they think and how they're respond the drone. we don't hear their voices. well in this book
the militia prime minister maliki told the prime minister's day at of sadr city now in some kind of alliance he just send these guys in and does not wait for approval. there is a huge decline of sectarian violence but here is where we come into a problem with counterinsurgency, pretorius has said the goal of the campaign is to create a breathing space so the factions can get there act together to forge a cohesive group but maliki had no interest to do any of this to set up the oil revenue sharing plan or no interest to bring in the sons of iraq's into the iraqi army as was promised so what we see now at a much, much lower-level sectarian violence and an unstable state. afghanistan, of betraying us comes from iraq is a miracle worker. i am condensing but he creates miracles and iraq may be afghanistan. obama as an experiment bought onto it with their counter insurgency strategy. the problem is remember the book i mentioned the trade is and others are consulting regularly, it is a good book but there is one chapter called conditions for a successful insurgency that might make an effort to grou
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)